Tall Sedum

by Irene Ecklund

Sedum grow in tough conditions and offer handsome foliage all season and loads of beautiful-attractive flowers in late summer to fall. Lots of newer varieties are coming along all the time. Below are eight of my favorites.

Green Expectations—Bluish green leaves with a light red tint to them and large clusters of unusual yellow-green flowers in August to October. Grow to 18–24 inches.

Neon—Large heads of dazzling pink flowers glow from late August to first frost. Gray green foliage turns yellow in fall and grows to 18 inches.

Purple Emperor—Is the darkest foliage yet and colors best in full sun. Pink purple flowers are held on dark red purple stems. Pinch this fast grower back by half in early June for compact plant. Grows to 15 inches.

Frosty Morn—Green leaves edged in white turn mahogany red in fall. In warmer climates flowers will be white, in cooler, light pink. Because it is variegated, it grows slowly and sometimes sends up green shoots. Prune them right away to keep plant from reverting. Full sun for a more upright sturdier stem—24 inches tall.

Lynda Windsor—Deep burgundy leaves and stems. This sedum is tidy and compact; has 2-3 inch wide clusters of ruby red flowers in late August—18 inches tall.

Crazy Ruffles—Cut and ruffled edges of the blue green leaves will catch your eye. Pink flowers open late summer—15 inches tall.

Samuel Oliphant—Pink edged cream, burgundy, and green leaves create a focal point. Variegation starts with the new shoots and doesn’t quit all season or face in sun, 5 inch wide clusters of light pink flowers turn darker in cold weather—30 inches tall.

Autumn Joy—Love this one. It has green leaves and is loaded with clusters of pink flowers from August to October when it turns brown and is a wonderful interest all winter season. Prolific and very easy to grow. Early June, I cut back in half to prevent flopping in fall if not in full sun. I use the cuts to start more plants just by sticking them into the soil.

Irene Ecklund is a Master Gardener from Omaha, Nebraska.

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